Ronny Whyte – Shades of Whyte

Ronny Whyte is of that rare breed: a seasoned performer, comfortable in the concert hall, dinner club, jazz room or cabaret. He doesn’t simply play and sing notes: he understands the lyrics and he tells the story. You believe him when he displays shades of Whyte in this aptly titled CD and exclaims “The Song is You”and “I Love the Way You Dance”. There’s heartfelt sincerity in his requests to “Linger Awhile” and “Love Me Tomorrow”, he no doubt means it in “I’ll Tell You What”. An imaginative arrangement of that ‘50s tale of a young girl’s awakening may strike a nostalgic note in “Nina Never Knew”. This collection is also seasoned with “A Little Samba” and a trio of songs with a Bossa Nova beat. Some vintage Jerome Kern, Blossom Dearie, Vernon Duke, Lerner & Lane and Schwartz & Dietz round out the program with style and heart. I am delighted to add this bouquet to my collection. —Elliott Ames WVOX- AM 1460,...

VSOJAZ 08/13/16 (The Quieter Side)

VSOJAZ 08/13/16 Name Time Album Artist 1 More Than You Know 5:53 We’ve Got A World That Swings Claire Martin 2 Easy to Remember 6:01 He Was the King Freddy Cole 3 Blackbird / Bye Bye Blackbird 4:18 Dream in the Blue Sara Gazarek & Josh Nelson 4 Two for the Road 5:52 Quiet Intentions Akio Sasajima & Carla Helmbrecht 5 A Bar Tone 3:34 The Flow Tom Lellis 6 Not You Again 2:35 United Dena Derose 7 Both Sides Now 3:13 Illusions Marissa Mulder 8 Broken Bicycles 4:17 Tom… in His Words Marissa Mulder 9 Where Are We Now? 5:32 The Theory of Joy Ian Shaw 10 Shattered 2:41 Lost Love Songs Cheryl Bentyne 11 You Taught My Heart To Sing 3:51 Quietly There Cheryl Fisher 12 Little Prayer – Wouldn’t It Be Loverly 5:17 Songs Of Life Scott...

The Fascinating Musical World of Nicola Conte

By combining elements of jazz, electronica, and Brazilian music, Italy’s Nicola Conte uses his skills as a composer, DJ, producer, and classically trained musician to fashion a distinctive sound that is as creative as it is endlessly entertaining.    The November 28th edition  of the “Vocal Sound Of Jazz” is entirely devoted to the exploration  Conte’s music....

Tierney Sutton – “The Paris Sessions”

Think you know every aspect of Tierney Sutton’s artistic persona? Think again. Hearing the Paris Sessions is to hear Sutton anew. Sure, it’s that same one-of-a-kind voice, but there’s no Tierney Sutton Band here, incredibly novel arrangements aren’t a priority on this one, and there’s no grand umbrella theme to contend with. This is simply a captivating listen-by-candlelight album that strikes to the heart of Tierney Sutton. Paris Sessions is easily the most informal item in Sutton’s discography, but the idea of informality shouldn’t carry a negative connotation; quite the opposite, in fact. This is a work of unfiltered beauty, successfully pairing vocal temptress with guitar and bass guitar. Two of the numbers recorded at this two day session—”Don’t Go To Strangers” and “Answer Me, My Love”—appeared on Sutton’s After Blue (BFM Jazz, 2013); the other ten—more standards, some bossa nova detours, and three originals written by Sutton’s chief collaborator on this project, guitarist Serge Merlaud are heard for the first time. Merlaud is along for this entire ride, an equal partner seated beside the singer. Some brief numbers even cede more than a minute to Merlaud, allowing for proper mood setting and introductions (“You Must Believe In Spring” and “You’re Nearer”). Elsewhere, Sutton leads the way, coolly gliding into a scene in inimitable fashion (“Estate”). Seven of the twelve numbers on the program also include the acoustic bass guitar work of Kevin Axt Kevin Axt . He provides integral support when holding down the bottom end, but he also takes on the role of rhythm guitarist on several occasions, allowing Sutton and Merlaud to drift along above. Sometimes it takes the arrival of an album to realize that something was missing in the first place. Such is the case with Paris Sessions. This is the hushed Sutton stunner that the jazz world didn’t even know it needed. Track...

Judy Carmichael’s Superb Jazz Vocal Recording

Known as one of the best stride and swing pianists around, Judy Carmichael is near-equally renowned for her lively, intelligent radio show, Jazz Inspired. (Full disclosure: Transcriptions of conversations from that show are available at JazzTimes.com.) Carmichael’s vocal skills remain a tertiary source of admiration, primarily because they are, at least in terms of her recordings, a relatively new addition. It wasn’t until 2008, in the wake of 10 instrumental albums, that she added vocals to half the tracks on Come and Get It. At the time, Carmichael admitted a desire to unleash her “inner Peggy Lee.” Now, with the arrival of not only her first all-vocals album but also the first on which she never touches a keyboard, that wish is fully realized.Carmichael exhibits a truly remarkable ability to channel Lee’s breathy invitingness and her befogged insouciance. But this collection of 11 standards also echoes the intense perspicacity of the solo albums Annie Ross released prior to, during and immediately after her affiliation with Lambert and Hendricks. In other words, she winningly blends two of the all-time finest, most intuitive jazz singers.Like Lee and Ross, Carmichael shows tremendous respect for her fellow musicians—tenor saxophonist Harry Allen, pianist Mike Renzi and bassist Jay Leonhart—allowing each ample space to leisurely stretch out.  (By Christopher Loudon, Jazz Times)...

Spider Saloff Sings Gershwin At The Ferguson July 16

Although she is far from a household name in the Hampton Roads area, the upcoming performance by Chicago based vocalist Spider Saloff promises to be a special evening for jazz vocal music  aficionados.  Saloff has been a fixture on the vibrant Chicago jazz vocal scene for me many years.   She has recorded about a half dozen albums over the last 20 years.    Her latest was a musically adventurous collection entitled “Like Glass”.  It was released in 2005 and was featured heavily on “The Vocal Sound of Jazz”.   In presenting her Gershwin program at The Ferguson she will be drawing from her 1997 release “The Memory of All That”, which was an all Gershwin musical...

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